Past Events – WCAIMH Talk: January 22, 2015: Working with First Nations Families

SPEAKER: Doris is a proud member of the Stl’atl’imx Nation and N’quatqua band which is 70 km north of Whistler. She has worked in the helping field within the Urban Aboriginal community for the past 17 years. Doris is currently at Alan Cashmore Centre, providing mental health services to infants and children under 5 years old.  SUMMARY: Doris talked about her experiences living and working in the urban Aboriginal community. She emphasized that families with young children need time to build a relationship with service providers, and that mutual respect and collaboration requires thoughtful and compassionate responses to their...

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Past events – WCAIMH November 27, 2014: A Creative Approach to Problem Solving for Children under Six Years

SPEAKER:  Dr. Cindy Hanna, R. Psych, Department of Psychology, Infant Psychiatry Clinic, BC Childrens Hospital   SUMMARY:  Collaborative problem solving can be effectively used with young children. Dr. Hanna will teach us the principles of this approach which helps children learn to be a part of the solution.

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Past events – WCAIMH October 23, 2014: Infant Development and Family Systems: A Look at Mahler’s Stages

SPEAKER:  Mary Frost, M.S. RCC, Counsellor and play therapist at Living Systems Counselling, North Vancouver, BC     SUMMARY:  Family systems theory focuses on the influence of both parents on a child’s emotional development, but many attachment theories focus on only the mother-child dyad. Mary Frost, a play therapist and family systems clinician, has looked at Mahler’s research and found intriguing and valuable lessons on how development is guided by the interplay between all family...

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Past events – WCAIMH September 25, 2014: Learning to Self-regulate

SPEAKER: Lynda Phillips, Ph.D. Child &Youth Care Counselling, Faculty of Child, Family and Community Studies, Douglas College     SUMMARY: Self-regulation is an integrative construct which involves the ability to manage arousal, attention, emotion, behaviour and cognition in an adaptive way in order to engage in goal directed behaviour (Neuenschwander et. al., 2012) and is linked to school success and later productive adult functioning. Parents, caregivers and teachers, via their proximal interactions, shape a child’s skills to self-regulate throughout the course of development (McClelland & Cameron, 2011). Consequently, a child’s self-regulation cannot be reduced to aspects of either the individual or the context alone, as it grows out of the synergistic effects of both. This presentation will demonstrate how our pan-Canadian observational study using Day in The Life (DITL) methodology to explore the experiences of immigrant five-year-old children identified as ‘doing well’ as they adapt to living inter-culturally, provides an opportunity to view behaviours associated with self-regulation in real time. This methodology uses photographic techniques, digital videotaping, field notes, contextual mapping and interviews, and as such enables us to present real time examples of how the intercultural space in which a child finds himself affects the skills associated with self-regulation as he transitions from home to school. Examples of advocating for self and cooperating with others will be...

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